Image of CHICAGO'S SOUTHSIDE 1946-1948: PHOTOGRAPHS BY WAYNE F. MILLER
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Miller, Wayne F. (Photographer); Schell, Orville; Parks, Gordon & Stepto, Robert B. (Contributors). CHICAGO'S SOUTHSIDE 1946-1948: PHOTOGRAPHS BY WAYNE F. MILLER. Berkeley, CA: University Of California Press/Stephen Daiter Gallery, 2000. Hardcover. First Edition/First Printing. 112 pages. Fine/Fine.

Retrospective collection of photographs. One of the most important American photography books of our time. Limited Slipcased Edition. Precedes and should not be confused with the regular trade edition. Published in a one-time-only print run of 75 copies. None of the copies was commercially sold. The Limited Edition is now rare. A brilliant production by The Stephen Daiter Gallery: Oversize-volume format. Black cloth boards with metallic-silver titles embossed on cover and spine, as issued. Photographs by Wayne F. Miller. Texts by the great American journalist Orville Schell, the great African-American photographer Gordon Parks, and Curator Robert B. Stepto. Elegant hand-made slipcase with black titles pasted on the spine. Printed on pristine-white, thick coated stock paper in Hong Kong to the highest standards. The reproduction quality is exemplary in every respect. In pictorial DJ with titles on the cover and spine, as issued. The DJ is covered in the publisher's protective glassine sheet. Presents, in its Limited Slipcased Edition, Wayne F. Miller's "Chicago's Southside 1946-1948". The most collectible edition of the inaugural volume of the American Contemporary Photography Series of the University of California's School of Journalism. "Chronicles a black Chicago: The South Side community that burgeoned as thousands of African-Americans, exclusively from the South, settled in the city during the Great Migration. Provides a visual history of Chicago at the height of its industrial order, when the stockyards, steel mills, and factories were booming. More important, they capture the intimate moments in the daily lives of ordinary people. Miller was adept at becoming invisible, and his photographs are full of naked, disarming emotion. One of the first Western photographers to document the destruction of Hiroshima and the survivors of the bombing, Wayne F. Miller had just returned from his stint as a World War II Navy combat photographer under the direction of Edward Steichen when he received two concurrent Guggenheim Fellowships to fund his Chicago project. In addition to affording a glimpse into the hopes and hardships shared by a community of migrants, the images reflect the enormous variety of human experiences and emotions that occurred at a unique time and place in the American landscape. A superb testament to the genius of the photographer, to the spirit of the people the images portray, and to the moment in American history these photographs capture" (Publisher's blurb). Rightly or wrongly, Wayne F. Miller will probably always be remembered as Edward Steichen's Associate Curator for "The Family of Man" Exhibition because the latter remains the single most influential photographic exhibition ever mounted in the medium's history. It showed eight - a staggering number for one artist - of Miller's photographs. An absolute "must-have" title for Wayne F. Miller collectors. This is a copy of the Limited Slipcased Edition. It is very prominently and beautifully signed in black ink-pen on the title page by Wayne F. Miller. It is signed directly on the page itself, not on a tipped-in page. This title is a late-modern photography classic. As far as we know, this is the only copy of the Limited Slipcased Edition available online and is in especially fine condition: Clean, crisp, and bright, a pristine beauty. A rare signed copy thus. Lavishly illustrated with photographic plates. One of the finest American photographers of the 20th century. A fine collectible copy. (SEE ALSO OTHER WAYNE F. MILLER TITLES IN OUR CATALOG). ISBN 0520223160. $300.00

This item is available for purchase. This web page was most recently updated on October 16, 2019.